What 7 steps help reduce both diabetes and heart disease?

Diabetes and Heart Disease are intimately linked. During Heart Month (February 2019) I will be posting regularly how individuals and employers can tackle these diseases together.

People with Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) have 2-4 times the risk heart attack or a stroke than people who don’t. Making lifestyle change to either preventT2DM, reverse it or manage it better reduces this risk.  Managing risk needs to happen in all parts of people’s lives. As an employer if you want a healthier workforce, invest in advice and education to support your staff.

The American Heart Association has defined a list called Life’s simple 7. These changes manage heart disease risk and diabetes. They are core to the messages taught in group, online and individual education sessions by Helen Gibbs Dietitian Ltd

1.            If you smoke, stop.

How can you help those who still smoke? Many smokers fear weight gain.  Getting information on the relative risk of weight vs. smoking is important. Receiving education on how to minimize this gain helps.  

2.            Eat better.

My education sessions promote dietary improvement. Diet improvement can improve health independent of weight loss. Recent research has demonstrated the importance of a high fibre diet, part of ‘nutrient dense eating.’. In my courses and 1:1 sessions I focus on “nutrient dense eating”. This style of eating improves health and reduces disease risk, regardless of weight change.

3.            Get regular physical activity

I work hard achieve appropriate physical activity levels, so I get it.  I have a lot of empathy for clients and their struggles to be active. This personal experience has informed my learning. I use what I have learned to motivate people to be more active.  Employers may need to think how they can support increased activity in daily living. If people are active there is a benefit to the employer in reduced absenteeism

4.            Lose weight if you are overweight

Unlike some dietitians I am not a proponent of Health At Every Size (HAES) model of care. We have to get rid of the worst parts of dieting culture; but we need to support people to improve their health through body fat reduction. Individual care means addressing the most important aspect of eating for that person. If clients have disordered eating or eating distress, they need support to address this. Many people are too ashamed to discuss their eating distress. Having a compassionate and experienced dietitian accessible to your workforce increases their chance of asking for help.

5.            Keep your blood pressure in the proper range

In group sessions I talk about what to do, and how to do it. This includes the changes needed to reduce blood pressure. The good news is these changes can also improve other aspects of health.  Workplaces with canteens or onsite food supplies may need to match education with better choices. If you are large enough to have these services you are large enough to need a detailed food policy. The impact of alcohol can not be overstated with blood pressure. I provide alcohol harm reduction education as part of lifestyle education.

6.            Keep your blood fats and cholesterol levels in a healthy range.

The media coverage of the possible causes of heart disease has left people confused.  Providing evidence-based advice and practical ‘How to’ education helps your staff make informed choices.

7.            Keep your blood glucose under control.

Elevated blood sugar damages the circulation.  Even if you have a fit and healthy workforce, they damage their health by drinking sugar containing soft drinks and energy drinks. Your business can have policy to support water drinking.  Once people have pre-diabetes or Type 2 diabetes, cutting back sugar is not enough. I work with people so they understand that they need to cut their saturated fat to lower blood glucose levels. Saturated fat acts to increase insulin resistance, making the locks stickier (link to video). Insulin resistance limits the work of circulating insulin.

New Zealand has an aging workforce. We also have increasing rates of diabetes and heart disease. Having unwell staff costs you money. Investing in prevention makes sense. Contact me if you want to know more about the services I offer.

First step: If you have health insurance for your staff see if dietetic services are covered. If they are not ask why.