Some of my best friends are nutritionists…

Lots of people ask me why they should see a dietitian rather than a nutritionist.
I am a dietitian. So I am registered to practice with the dietitian’s board. I have completed a recognized qualification in Dietetitics . Each year I have to provide evidence I am maintaining my professional learning.
I am also a nutritionist, although currently not on the Nutrition Society register.
This illustrates an important difference.

Anyone can call themselves a nutritionist. It is illegal to use the term dietitian unless you are on the register.

What about qualifications? In the title I hint at an irony. I have worked with nutritionists. I have seen very skilled practitioners with an undergraduate qualification in nutrition. I believe that nutritionists and dietitians can work in partnership. Here is the difficulty. Everyone needs to know what they are good at. They need to know what to do when a patient has some health issue they are not familiar with.

Why come and see me , not another dietitian?

I have spent 20 years in practice learning how my job fits in with other health professionals working in primary care. As a result I have gained a lot of experience in the health conditions that a GP will see and treat. So I am more of a generalist than a specialist, and that works for most people who need dietary advice in our community.

I have also worked with enough secondary care team members, that my sense of “that’s not routine” is quite well developed. I am quite happy to share that with anyone who needs to hear it too. I have good relationships with specialists and I work to maintain them.

The single most important qualification a dietitian or nutritionist can have other than their professional learning is the ability to listen. In psychology they talk about a therapeutic relationship. Because food is such an intimate subject, you need to trust the person giving you advice. This is why I am happy to speak to you on the phone before you book. This is so you can work out if I am the right person for you.
So if you need dietary advice, give me a call, no obligations.

4 Replies to “Some of my best friends are nutritionists…”

    1. A therapeutic relationship is the way the client and the practitioner communicate. A positive one occurs when there is respectful communication from the practitioner recognizing that the client will be best able to manage their own health through being given positive and clear advice that fits their life circumstances.

    1. Hi Ratri, Primary Care is the term for General Practitioners and those who work with them. Secondary care is the lowest level of care in a hospital including outpatients and rehabilitation.

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