How do you get 30g fibre in your diet daily?

There has been a lot of media coverage about fibre in the diet. A high fibre diet reduces the risk of heart disease. We know that 90% of people are failing to get enough fibre.  So how do you improve your dietary fibre intake? How do you do it on a low income?

Fibre occurs in plant-based foods. The relevant Eating statements for adult New Zealanders are:

Enjoy a variety of nutritious foods every day including:

  •              plenty of vegetables and fruit
  •              grain foods, mostly whole grain and those naturally high in fibre
  •            some legumes, nuts, seeds, fish and other seafood, eggs, poultry (e.g., chicken) and/or red meat with the fat removed.

Choose and/or prepare foods and drinks:

  •    that are mostly ‘whole’ and less processed

I demonstrate how I would address each eating statement below. In the lists I only show the fibre containing foods. There would be other things added to the meals such as milk, cheese, yogurt, meat and cooking oils etc

Plenty of vegetables and fruit

I used the “what’s fresh” website to select seasonal fruit and vegetables based on the day of writing the blog. Eating seasonally can be a challenge if you have strong likes and dislikes.  It is important to encourage ongoing “tries” of vegetables to encourage a wide variety. Frozen vegetables are acceptable

Item Amount (as eaten) Fibre
Green Beans 80g 2.7
Corn on the cob – 1 medium 90g 2.4
Lettuce 50g 1.0
Tomato – medium 50g 1.7
Cucumber – 4 slices with skin 50g 1.5
Strawberries – 4 large 80g 1.2
Orange – 1 medium 90g 3.1
  TOTAL 13.6g

In this instance I imagined that the salad would go with lunch, and the cooked vegetables would go with dinner.

grain foods, mostly whole grain and those naturally high in fibre

The most common complaint I get is the cost of wholegrain bread. For the purpose of this exercise I am going to use a $1 loaf of bread. This will illustrate cheap bread can still help you meet your fibre intake. I am suggesting you use a sandwich slice and choose the wheatmeal bread

Item Amount (as eaten) Fibre
3 slices wheatmeal bread ($1 range) 94g 4.2g
Oats 45g 5.8g
Pasta (white own brand) 200g (100g dried) 4.0g
  TOTAL 14g

some legumes*, nuts, seeds, fish and other seafood, eggs, poultry (e.g., chicken) and/or red meat with the fat removed.

Item Amount (as eaten) Fibre
Peanut butter 20g 1.2g
Almonds 15g 1.3
Lentils 15g 1.6g
  TOTAL 4.5g
  • 20g peanut butter – see below
  • 30g of almonds consumed every second day
  • If you had two vegetarian meals each week e you would meet this goal. Each meal contains at least 50g (120g cooked) of lentils or other beans. If you are not able to sneak vegetarian past your family use lentils mixed in with your mince.

Choose and/or prepare foods and drinks: that are mostly ‘whole’ and less processed

 One of the biggest ways to improve fibre intake is have snacks that are mostly whole and less processed.

Snacks arranged here are not the usual processed cakes, biscuits and crackers.

  •               1 slice bread with 20g peanut butter daily (afternoon tea)
  •               1 piece of fruit as snacks (supper time)
  •               30g almonds every second day (morning tea)

This is a fairly basic diet.  Not everyone is going to stick to this all the time. Following the 80% rule (make good choices 80% if the time) then you can get a good fibre intake

If you would like to know more about fibre in the diet and have a diet makeover to increase your fibre intake, then make an appointment to see me.